Kettlebell Complex: Beauty in Simplicity

4458533582_79bc0117d5_zI’ve been trying out this new kettlebell complex I made last week. It’s more to do with endurance and strength than anything else. It’s simple but it will definitely take its toll on your body. I conjured this while lying on my back, thinking of my previous article and about how it is sometimes important to stick with the basics.

Complexes are great specially if you have a lot of equipment available for use. But often times people perform these complexes in an attempt to complete or finish them without focusing on technique and form. I’ve seen too many people finish these complexes just so they can tell themselves how they were able to complete it. This is dangerous for people who aren’t so experienced with kettlebells. Injuries usually stem from repeating an imperfect technique which results from the user adjusting the technique to their liking and not them adjusting to it.

Let’s get this straight: When you are training, the technique remains static at all costs and the user will be the one to mold themselves around it even if they have to use lighter weights. The technique is like a constant that it has a fixed value which most people have agreed to and with the reason being safety.

It goes without saying that sometimes we tend to forget how to properly execute a simple swing or a clean what with all the fun we’re having at doing swing-squat-clean complexes. Don’t get me wrong; I’m not saying going beyond the basic move set is not the way to go. What I’m saying is 100 perfectly executed swings is far better than a swing-clean-press-squat-push up complex done in a “just to finish” fashion. Not only are you not maximizing the fat burning and strength building capability of the workout but you’re also risking injury, something proper form would have prevented. The purpose of going back to basics is to review your foundation, testing the stability of the very platform in which you have placed your kettlebell skills. It’s a chance to see if you’re straying or staying; focused or distracted.

NEXT: Beauty in Simplicity

Robert James
Follow me

Robert James

Food Scientist. Fitness and Health Aficionado. Investor. Writer.

He likes to tell people how to grow their money and how to naturally lose body fat. He owns Fit and Write, a website catered to his passion to write about health and fitness. His main weapon against weakness is the kettlebell.
Robert James
Follow me

Pages: 1 2

6 thoughts on “Kettlebell Complex: Beauty in Simplicity

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *